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Law, Power, and Justice The Protection of Personal Rights in the Indian Penal Code

By: Dhagamwar, Vasudha.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New Delhi Sage Publication 1992Edition: 2nd.Description: 392 pg.ISBN: .Subject(s): Law | Criminal LawDDC classification: 343.0954 Summary: Dhagamwar, V.: Law, Power, and Justice. (2nd) New Delhi. Sage Publication Inc., 1992. --(343.0954 D38L)Summary: "Dhagamwar's book has clearly brought out the fact that in spite of glib statements by government officials that atrocities against women are on the decrease or that the government is actively preparing to take stringent action against those committing atrocities, drastic action still needs to be taken if we want to continue calling ourselves a clivilised nation. Sensitive policy-makers should study the book if they really intend to implement the constitutional mandate of justice for all." --Indian Journal of Gender Studies Exploring the relationship between law, power and justice in colonial and independent India, Dhagamwar gives a vivid historical account of the making and working of the Indian Penal Code, especially in the areas that affect the personal liberty of the individual. She examines a large number of recent and historical judgements in which character and sexual ethics played a part, and then critically evaluates the outcome of these cases in terms of the manner in which they interpreted the Indian Penal Code. This study shows the importance of a proper understanding of legal institutions and processes in a country where practice often departs greatly from principle. The author describes recent efforts and proposes ways to reform what are essentially colonial laws so that they can suit the needs of the changing times while serving the ends of justice. This unique study of Indian criminal law will interest researchers and students of social and legal history, political science, and India Studies. "The book is a serious study of the gross inequalities and injustice under which the less fortunate women of this country suffer." --Social Change "This is a thought-provoking and concise account of the Indian Penal Code, as it was formulated from the 1830s, with particular emphasis on crimes against women, like rape, abduction, slavery and sale....The book remains a pioneering venture in a difficult field, and should be read by historians, lawyers, social scientists, and activists alike. --Indian Economic and Social History Review "This book had already received recognition in academic circles in its first edition. The present edition is an improvement in content as well as in production. It would be of great use to all those who are interested in studying the interaction between law and society and particularly on the use of law as an instrument of social change." --Economic and Political Weekly "Vasudha Dhagamwar, a seasoned scholar and social activist, excels as an author. I enjoyed reading her recent book, lucidly written and packed with a wealth of thought and information." --Indian Journal of Social Science
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Womens' Studies Womens' Studies Mumbai
Womens' Studies Lib
343.0954 D38L (Browse shelf) Available W01715
Book Book Mumbai
343.0954 D38L (Browse shelf) Available 080840

Dhagamwar, V.: Law, Power, and Justice. (2nd) New Delhi. Sage Publication Inc., 1992. --(343.0954 D38L)

"Dhagamwar's book has clearly brought out the fact that in spite of glib statements by government officials that atrocities against women are on the decrease or that the government is actively preparing to take stringent action against those committing atrocities, drastic action still needs to be taken if we want to continue calling ourselves a clivilised nation. Sensitive policy-makers should study the book if they really intend to implement the constitutional mandate of justice for all." --Indian Journal of Gender Studies Exploring the relationship between law, power and justice in colonial and independent India, Dhagamwar gives a vivid historical account of the making and working of the Indian Penal Code, especially in the areas that affect the personal liberty of the individual. She examines a large number of recent and historical judgements in which character and sexual ethics played a part, and then critically evaluates the outcome of these cases in terms of the manner in which they interpreted the Indian Penal Code. This study shows the importance of a proper understanding of legal institutions and processes in a country where practice often departs greatly from principle. The author describes recent efforts and proposes ways to reform what are essentially colonial laws so that they can suit the needs of the changing times while serving the ends of justice. This unique study of Indian criminal law will interest researchers and students of social and legal history, political science, and India Studies. "The book is a serious study of the gross inequalities and injustice under which the less fortunate women of this country suffer." --Social Change "This is a thought-provoking and concise account of the Indian Penal Code, as it was formulated from the 1830s, with particular emphasis on crimes against women, like rape, abduction, slavery and sale....The book remains a pioneering venture in a difficult field, and should be read by historians, lawyers, social scientists, and activists alike. --Indian Economic and Social History Review "This book had already received recognition in academic circles in its first edition. The present edition is an improvement in content as well as in production. It would be of great use to all those who are interested in studying the interaction between law and society and particularly on the use of law as an instrument of social change." --Economic and Political Weekly "Vasudha Dhagamwar, a seasoned scholar and social activist, excels as an author. I enjoyed reading her recent book, lucidly written and packed with a wealth of thought and information." --Indian Journal of Social Science

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